The Art of Zaha Hadid in London

“I’ve always been interested in the concept of fragmentation and the ideas of abstraction and explosion, to deconstruct the ideas of repetition and mass production. My will is first compared with the first Russian avant-garde; in particular with the work of Kasimir Malevch – which was an early influence on me as a representative of the modern avant-garde, the intersection between art and design. Malevich discovered abstraction as an experimental principle that can act as a propellant for the creative work up to levels of invention never of heard before; This abstract work has allowed very high levels of creativity.” Zaha Hadid, 2007

'Metropolis', 1988; © Zaha Hadid Foundation
‘Metropolis’, 1988; © Zaha Hadid Foundation

From the 8th of December 2016 to the 12th of February 2017, the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, in the heart of Hyde Park in London is hosting the exhibition “Zaha Hadid, Early Paintings and Drawings”, a presentation originally designed by Zaha Hadid herself, where the paintings and notebooks of drawings date back to the years prior to the Vitra Fire Station in Germany (1993, the first construction of one of ther projects).

Zaha Hadid, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (8 December 2016 – 12 February 2017)  © Zaha Hadid Foundation. Image © 2016 Luke Hayes
Zaha Hadid, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (8 December 2016 – 12 February 2017)
© Zaha Hadid Foundation. Image © 2016 Luke Hayes

The Serpentine Sackler Gallery built in 1805 was originally a military warehouse, it was renewed in 2013 by Zaha Hadid Architects, joining a nineteenth century structure, made of bricks, and one of the twentyfirst century, a tensile structure.

Serpentine Sackler Gallery; © 2013 Luke Hayes
Serpentine Sackler Gallery; © 2013 Luke Hayes

Works by Zaha Hadid are energetic and dynamic. As her structures, her paintings tend towards motion, by not being bound by the constraints of matter, the forms are free to follow the slender trajectories. The subjects that recall the typical volumes of its harmonious structures stand out in a two-dimensional landscapes.

Zaha Hadid, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (8 December 2016 – 12 February 2017)
Zaha Hadid, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (8 December 2016 – 12 February 2017)

Four of the paintings on display are recreated in 3D and are made available through virtual reality viewers. The forms emerge from the canvas and become abstract landscapes in which the viewer is accompanied on a virtual tour. The possibilities of three-dimensional representation is being pushed to its limits, making it even more exciting of the paintings already able to communicate vividly.

Screenshot. Zaha Hadid: Virtual Reality Experience 2016, The Great Utopia: The Russian and Soviet Avant-Garde 1915 – 1932, 1992-93 - Tatlin Tower and Tectonic “Worldwind”, 1992-93 © Zaha Hadid Foundation
Screenshot. Zaha Hadid: Virtual Reality Experience 2016, The Great Utopia: The Russian and Soviet Avant-Garde 1915 – 1932, 1992-93 – Tatlin Tower and Tectonic “Worldwind”, 1992-93 © Zaha Hadid Foundation

Serpentine Sackler Gallery – Zaha Hadid Early Paintings and Drawings
West Carriage Drive
London
W2 2AR
Open Tuesday to Sunday from 10 to 18.
Free admission

FROM KANDINSKY TO POLLOCK. The Art of the Guggenheim Collections – Florence (IT)

An unmissable chance to see the Guggenheim collection in Italy: Constraint Magazine attended the Palazzo Strozzi’s opening exhibition “From Kandinsky to Pollock, The Art of the Guggenheim Collections” in Florence.

Palazzo Strozzi
Palazzo Strozzi, outdoor detail. Photo by Jenny Stelmakh.

Constraint Magazine continues its tour in the Italian overview: it moves, investigates, picking new ideas to enrich his experience and, we hope, those of our readers.

Today we want to describe our experience in Florence, where we are for an exhibition’s opening, a major exhibition starting on Saturday, March 19.
We’re at Palazzo Strozzi, an historic palace of the Renaissance and an exceptional location, specifically chosen to host some of the works of the Guggenheim collections.
The exhibition is the result of a collaboration between the Palazzo Strozzi Foundation and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in New York, which presents more than 100 works including European and American Art, from the twenties to the sixties of the twentieth century.

Roaring Lion II, Mirko Basaldella (1910–1969), 1956. Bronze, 77 x 94 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Gift, Vera and Raphael Zariski 2004
Photo by David Heald
Roaring Lion II
Mirko Basaldella (1910–1969), 1956. Bronze, 77 x 94 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Gift, Vera and Raphael Zariski 2004
Photo by David Heald

The exhibition’s uniqueness is not only guaranteed by the unquestionable importance of the works or the exceptional names, cornerstones of the avanguards of the twentieth century. The exhibition creates a thread, a story with images, a network of narratives that describe the life and passions of Peggy and the uncle Solomon, the biography of the artists, their relationship with collectors as well as the development and maturation of the art in the season of the avantgarde.
The story tells about an eclectic uncle and an ambitious nephew linked together by the taste and love for contemporary art: the story of Solomon and Peggy Guggenheim, the bulwarks of modern art patronage.
That’s right. The patronage of the past, the one of Florence during the Renaissance, from Cosimo “Il Vecchio” to his nephew “Lorenzo il Magnifico”, that blends and takes on a new role and recurs to our eyes.
Different artistic movements are then confronted: the masters of modern art (from Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Man Ray, Pablo Picasso), informal art (Europeans informal as Alberto Burri, Emilio Vedova, Lucio Fontana, Jean Dubuffet) until American art of the fifties and sixties (like Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, Alexander Calder, Roy Lichtenstein, Cy Twombly).

Roy Lichtenstein, Preparedness, 1968
Roy Lichtenstein, Preparedness, 1968. Photo by Jenny Stelmakh.

The exhibition takes place in nine rooms: in addition to the Guggenheim collections room, the second room has particular importance on the relationship between the two continents, “Europe and America”. This room tells us about the new avant-garde birth; then continue in a space (room 3) entirely dedicated to the artist Pollock, strongly supported by Peggy.
The journey between the images leads us then in the 4th room, dedicated to abstract expressionism (especially important the works of William de Kooning); then along the 5th hall dedicated to the new trends in the 2nd post-war scenario; the hall 6, however, is the one that opens the season’s exhibition at the Guggenheim Collection in Venice at “Palazzo Venier dei Leoni” (at the end of World War II, Peggy bought Palazzo Venier where he decided to open one of his private collection to the public).
Going beyond the magnificent room 7 entitled “the great American painting”, the next room consecrates the iconic figure of Mark Rothko (Peggy was a great admirer, so much so to dedicate an exhibition at her gallery called “Art of This Century”, around the middle of the Forties).
The tour ends in room 9, entitled “The sixties. The beginning of a new era “: in this room you can admire one of the greatest works of Lichtenstein, “Preparations” which opens a new art period, the Pop Art.

Jackson Pollock - The Moon Woman 1942
Jackson Pollock, The Moon Woman, 1942. Photo by Jenny Stelmakh.

An itinerant journey. Entering the first room (Room 1. Guggenheim and their collections) there are some of the works presented in an original and at the same time familiar scenario. The feeling is in fact to be in the spaces of the two New Yorkers collectors: on the left is presented a picture from the “Art of This Century” show, the Peggy’s museum / gallery opened in 1942, while to the right there’s a photo of Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, an internationally renowned place, known by everybody.
The observer is brought into a spatial and temporal dimension far away from reality, certainly imaginary, but that somehow brings him closer to the Peggy and Solomon’s life spaces and places.
We believe this is one of the most significant features of the exhibition: it encourages the visitor to produce with a bit of imagination a credible scenario that in some way creates a bond, an intimate relationship by perceiving that sense of closeness to the taste and passion of both collectors.
Thanks to this travel with the imagination, we can project ourselves into Peggy’s living room, while she cuddles her Pekingese Twinkle, sitting on her sofa, maybe enjoying the discovery of a new artist with the uncle Solomon. Both seduced by the beauty surrounding them, never satiated by art and newness, always curious and inspired to amaze and surprise.

Vasilij Vasil'evič Kandinskij, Dominant Curve, 1936
Vasilij Vasil’evič Kandinskij, Dominant Curve, 1936. Photo by Jenny Stelmakh.

In the same days of Palazzo Strozzi’s opening exhibition a new documentary on Peggy Guggenheim’s life is being released, directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland. One more opportunity to learn about this emblematic figure of the twentieth century.

Address: PALAZZO STROZZI: Piazza degli Strozzi, 50123 Firenze
Period: 19 March-24 July 2016
TICKETS
Full price € 12,00
Reduced and groups € 9,50 e € 4,00
Advance sale charge per ticket (excluding schools) is €1.00.
More information

To make a reservation please contact
CSC Sigma
Dal lunedì al venerdì
Monday to Friday, 9.00-13.00; 14.00-18.00
Tel. +39 055 2469600 / Fax +39 055 244145
prenotazioni@palazzostrozzi.org

Review by Chiara Tomè (Twitter @ChiarTom Instagram @chiaratm)
Photos by Jenny Stelmakh (Instagram @ssovietica)

Ai Weiwei – Royal Academy of Arts – London

If you have plans to go to London until the end of the week, to visit Winter Wonderland or one of the thousands (expensive) Christmas markets spread through the city, well, we suggest you a way more tempting alternative. Until December 13, in fact, the only unmissable event in the capital city of the Kingdom is the Ai Weiwei’s exhibition that takes place at the Royal Academy of Arts, in the crowded Piccadilly.

Until December 13, in fact, the only unmissable event in the capital city of the Kingdom is the Ai Weiwei’s exhibition that takes place at the Royal Academy of Arts, in the crowded Piccadilly.

Ai Weiwei’s reputation precedes him, and nobody knows if he is more famous for his skills as an artist and an architect or for his political and social commitment, commitment that has seen him also incarcerated by the Chinese government for 81 days. No doubt all this peculiarities of him stand out from the retrospective London dedicated to him, the biggest ever realized in the city, even though Ai has already worked in London five years ago for the famous “Sunflower Seeds” installation at the Tate Modern.

The retrospective opens up to the city in every sense: once reached the public courtyard of the Royal Academy of Arts, in fact, one collides right away with the Trees installation, made up of eight trees that naturally died in the mountains of southern China. The installation has been funded by a RA Kickstater campaign, that has seen more than 1300 backer and over 100.000 pounds collected.

Una foto pubblicata da Ai Weiwei (@aiww) in data:

Inside the building, the retrospective runs through 11 galleries, each of which greets the guest bluntly, leaving him immediately in front of the current piece of art. Pieces that are often majestic, and always full of meaning. Disarming is the installation, in the third gallery, regarding the 2008 Sichuan earthquake: on the walls we found the names of the children who died in the destroyed schools; on the floor reinforcing steel bars, coming directly from the collapsed structures and illegally recovered by Ai.

Una foto pubblicata da Ai Weiwei (@aiww) in data:

Not less powerful is the series of works in the next gallery, who narrate the sad conclusion of Ai’s studio in Shanghai, asked for by the municipality and then destroyed nearly completed by the government, as a revenge for the extremely critical opinions Ai has had towards it. In a corner takes place the famous installation He Xie, a cascade of river crabs representing dissidence, since the word, meaning both crab and harmonious, is used by the opponents to exemplify how the regime tries to create an harmonious society, deprived of contestants.

He Xie, Ai Weiwei #royalacademyofarts #london #cp_londra

Una foto pubblicata da Francesco Contin (@french295) in data:

The exhibition continues placing the visitor constantly in front of themes such as privacy or perception of measure, until arriving at a realistic representation of Ai’s life in prison, made through eight model portraying real life situations lived by the artist during the incarceration. The spirits are lighten only at the end of the exhibition, where the site – specific installation Bicycle Chandelier stands out, a piece of art realized by Ai expressly for this exhibition.

Bicycle Chandelier #AiWeiwei #royalacademyofarts #london #cp_londra Una foto pubblicata da @bettypav in data:

Therefore, if you happen to be in London in the next few days, you cannot miss this experience. To meet the visitors’ needs the Royal Academy is opening up for 56 hours straight during the final weekend: an after party at an art gallery has never been so tempting.

Post by Elisabetta Paviotti (? @BettyPav)

Ars Electronica Festival 2015 – Linz (AT)

Ars Electronica Festival is a big “container” of art and technology (and everything there is between them). Arts and technology connect in several ways: technical innovation and its consequences on society is one of the main topics in art today.
Touch screens, virtual reality visors and other interfaces are the main attraction of the exhibitions and then there are technology related artworks, not made of technology, but made to make us meditate on tech.

Photo showing an impression of voestalpine Klangwolke (Cloud of Sound) 2015: Hochwald. Tanz der Bäume im Donaupark. The woods come to town: For the voestalpine Klangwolke 2015, director Hubert Lepka and his company Lawine Torrèn (AT) have taken their inspiration from Aldabert Stifter’s romantic tale “Hochwald.” The forest is the chief protagonist in both the original and Joey Wimplinger’s new text version. For Stifter, the woods still constituted a secure place of refuge for two young women during a time of troubles and war, whereas the current production scrutinizes the forest’s future prospects as a “natural landscape.” credit: Florian Voggeneder via

technical innovation and its consequences on society is one of the main topics in art today

This year’s topic was the “city of the future”, it may sound a bit banal or too general, but it has allowed expressing the whole potential of the event, making of Linz a city from the future for a week. Self-driving cars, electric motorbikes, hydroponics, organic food, internet of things, things of the internet et cetera  create an exciting enviroment interacting with the structures from the past, like the post, the historical city centre.

Photo showing the Mercedes-Benz F 015 Luxury in Motion during his stay in the main square of Linz. credit: Florian Voggeneder via

Each object of the exhibition has an essential caption, suitable for the generality of the audience. It was possible to figure out the meaning of each piece of art, and the functionality of every new technology.

Photo showing Death of Things (DoT) by Martín Nadal (ES) at Interface Cultures:Post-Post Exhibition during the Opening and Introduction Parcours. credit: tom mesic via

Just visit the Ars Electronica Center on every day of the year and try on the prosthesis of a tail and pet the robotic seal cub and you will agree.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/arselectronica/5514729300/in/photolist-9pjqTE-9pgnK4-isTqqd-ayArCp

“Paro” by Japans National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) is an animal-like robot that has been in use in Japan and Europe since 2003 for therapeutic purposes—for example, providing care to people with Alzheimer’s disease. Modeled on a baby seal, Paro registers environmental stimuli via two computers and five sensors that measure touch, light, sound, temperature and physical position. This enables it to interact with its human interlocutor. Paro is able to learn—it can recognize 50 different voices and responds to its name. The form of a baby seal was selected because most people have no preconceptions about how this creature behaves.
credit: rubra via

We managed to live the Ars Electronica not as experts, nor as engineers, enjoying the sense of wonder even for the most easy to understand technologies. Just visit the Ars Electronica Center on every day of the year and try on the prosthesis of a tail and pet the robotic seal cub and you will agree.

exhibition: ISMO KAJANDER Anartist – Kiasma, Helsinki (FI)

Ismo Kajander (b. 1939) is a Finnish artist, photographer, writer and lecturer whose career spans seven decades. The main focus in this retrospective at the Kiasma contemporary art museum in Helsinki, is on assemblages Kajander makes using everyday ready-made objects. Kajander’s inspiration for the works derives from literature, science and art history.
Years in Paris and a spiritual kinship with Dadaists active in the city in earlier decades are apparent in Kajander’s art. His politically oriented intellectual playfulness and rejection of prevalent norms in art both derive from Dadaism.
The title of the exhibition, Anartist, is a reference to Kajander’s anarchic position outside the mainstream of art.

The exhibition is leading us through many “art mash-ups”, some work with the clearness of the classics and other chaotic ready-made. Some artworks contain references to the life of the artist and require notions about Finnish history to be understood, but most of the show is using an artistic language that might be common to the whole western world.

Ismo Kajander  Exhibition view  Photo: Finnish National Gallery: Petri Virtanen courtesy of Kiasma_ Finnish National Gallery
Ismo Kajander, Exhibition view, Photo: Finnish National Gallery: Petri Virtanen
courtesy of Kiasma_ Finnish National Gallery

 

The most engaging work is the Music Machine (1964), made with the composer Henrik Otto Donner. It’s a non-linear combination of the Duchamp’s Bicycle wheel and John Cage’s compositions that imitates the concept of carillon on a ready-made scale, with a bicycle wheel and a rake. The result is a eerie noise that cames over the exhibition’s rooms.

It’s a non-linear combination of the Duchamp’s Bicycle wheel and John Cage’s compositions

taiteilija: Kajander, Ismo taiteilija: Donner, Henrik Otto Inventaarionro N-1991-31:A-B teosnimi: Musiikkikone haltija: AT ajoitus: 1964 tekniikkateksti: esinekooste ja ääni erikoisluokka: kooste aihe: musiikki ; kone mitat: syvyys 100 cm, leveys 260 cm, korkeus 190 cm Valokuvanro N-00253.211 ajoitus: 25.2.2002 valokuvaaja: Virtanen, Petri valokuvatyyppi: laakadia v/k sisältökuvaus: näyttelyripustuskuva; musiikki ja veistotaide, esineteos (mm. harava, polkupyörän vanne, kello, halko, tuulikello, lintuhäkki) Digikuvanro I0077801 skannaus 2009-03-03 skannaaja: Halkola, Kirsi digiluokitus: skannattu kuva digitointilaite: FlexTight kuvankäsittelyohjelmisto: Photoshop CS4
Ismo Kajander and Henrik Otto Donner, Musiikkikone / Music Machine (1964)
courtesy of Kiasma_ Finnish National Gallery

 

Music comes around as a theme in Guitar and Clarinet (2010) which is the materialization of what we’ve seen in our minds the first time we saw a Picasso.

Guitar and Clarinet 2010
Ismo Kajander Guitar and Clarinet 2010 Photo: Ismo Kajander
courtesy of Kiasma_ Finnish National Gallery

Harsh World (2007) is the most communicative work, its meaning it’s clear and powerful, standing out from the other hard-to-read ready-made compositions.

2009-tyly-maailma
Ismo Kajander, Harsh World (2007) assemblage, 48 x 70 x 27 cm Photo: Ismo Kajander
courtesy of Kiasma_ Finnish National Gallery

Pro tip for the selfie enthusiasts: don’t miss “Pieni spektaakkeli läheisyydestä” by Lauri Astala” from the permanent exhibition.

1985-mg-8532
Lauri Astala (2005) Pieni spektaakkeli läheisyydestä
courtesy of Kiasma _ Finnish National Gallery

Internet Drones _ the first part – Ultra – Udine (IT)

INTERNET DRONES is a project that aims to highlight the issues, aesthetics and artistic trends of the last generation influenced by the  massive use of new technologies and the internet.

We’re going to spend some time on this. INTERNET DRONES deserves definitely some attention for several reasons. The first one is that the people around this Ultra project is creating a new cultural enviroment – independent from the local  habitat. The second reason is the hypertextual structure of the post internet art. Given that the production is mainly online, you’re expected to look up for each one of the artists participating to this exhibition. The problem is that the hypertextual structure has no time and space limitations – like Chinese boxes bigger on the inside – and this is extreme when the artists want to make a reference to the batch capabilities of their algorithms.

the hypertextual structure has no time and space limitations

The exhibition is hosted by the eflux studio, a crossmedia design agency (and vintage Macintosch museum) in Udine, headed by Marotta and Russo, professors of the Academy of Fine Arts of Venice.  To get there you have to book a visit at least one day before, it’s for free ( like the best things in life).

Stefano Monti guided us through the whole exposition, making sure we viewed all the videos in their entirety and telling us incredible  art adventures. The drone theme looks like an excuse to involve a hot topic, the main discussion is about the object of art, the “thing” you pay for, the “thing” you own or the “thing” you consume.

Kim Asendorf, No content but rich – CSS composition (2014)
This work recalls the glorious demoscene.  It’s made of 128 online compositions floating rectangles made in css, painted in gradients . The elegance of the simplest and cleanest shapes and colors of this ideal spaces is well tuned with the ethereal movements. The resulting image is a concert of tri-dimensional isomorphous and vectorial transcendent structures. The contemporary art theme “to remove or to put on” rearranged to get into the humble space of the demoscene has a different meaning and flavour. The “mass” is in the code (25 KB) then the lightness flows into the composition and colors of the image(285 KB on my laptop).

http://kimasendorf.com/css-compositions/no-content-but-rich/1415138015706.html
Here the embedded page.

The contemporary art theme “to add or to remove” rearranged to get into the humble space of the demoscene has a different meaning and flavour.

If you’re getting into css you can also play with the code. Here some excerpts of it, from which it’s easy to get the poetic of the author:

#item6 {
    position: absolute;
    width: 466px;
    height: 439px;
    -moz-border-radius: 2px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 2px;
    border-radius: 2px;
    box-shadow: 0px 0px 4px 4px hsla(281, 65%, 87%, 0.01);
    background: -ms-linear-gradient(253deg, hsla(185, 61%, 24%, 0.33) 0%, hsla(59, 95%, 20%, 1.0) 9%, hsla(105, 47%, 90%, 1.0) 18%, hsla(18, 67%, 59%, 1.0) 27%, hsla(352, 12%, 12%, 0.14) 36%, hsla(263, 2%, 83%, 0.87) 45%, hsla(141, 55%, 90%, 1.0) 55%, hsla(350, 28%, 30%, 1.0) 64%, hsla(80, 80%, 43%, 1.0) 73%, hsla(206, 69%, 85%, 0.96) 82%, hsla(169, 81%, 36%, 0.32) 91%, hsla(149, 40%, 1%, 0.42) 100%);
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(253deg, hsla(185, 61%, 24%, 0.33) 0%, hsla(59, 95%, 20%, 1.0) 9%, hsla(105, 47%, 90%, 1.0) 18%, hsla(18, 67%, 59%, 1.0) 27%, hsla(352, 12%, 12%, 0.14) 36%, hsla(263, 2%, 83%, 0.87) 45%, hsla(141, 55%, 90%, 1.0) 55%, hsla(350, 28%, 30%, 1.0) 64%, hsla(80, 80%, 43%, 1.0) 73%, hsla(206, 69%, 85%, 0.96) 82%, hsla(169, 81%, 36%, 0.32) 91%, hsla(149, 40%, 1%, 0.42) 100%);
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(253deg, hsla(185, 61%, 24%, 0.33) 0%, hsla(59, 95%, 20%, 1.0) 9%, hsla(105, 47%, 90%, 1.0) 18%, hsla(18, 67%, 59%, 1.0) 27%, hsla(352, 12%, 12%, 0.14) 36%, hsla(263, 2%, 83%, 0.87) 45%, hsla(141, 55%, 90%, 1.0) 55%, hsla(350, 28%, 30%, 1.0) 64%, hsla(80, 80%, 43%, 1.0) 73%, hsla(206, 69%, 85%, 0.96) 82%, hsla(169, 81%, 36%, 0.32) 91%, hsla(149, 40%, 1%, 0.42) 100%);
    background: linear-gradient(to 253deg, hsla(185, 61%, 24%, 0.33) 0%, hsla(59, 95%, 20%, 1.0) 9%, hsla(105, 47%, 90%, 1.0) 18%, hsla(18, 67%, 59%, 1.0) 27%, hsla(352, 12%, 12%, 0.14) 36%, hsla(263, 2%, 83%, 0.87) 45%, hsla(141, 55%, 90%, 1.0) 55%, hsla(350, 28%, 30%, 1.0) 64%, hsla(80, 80%, 43%, 1.0) 73%, hsla(206, 69%, 85%, 0.96) 82%, hsla(169, 81%, 36%, 0.32) 91%, hsla(149, 40%, 1%, 0.42) 100%);
    -ms-transform: translate3d(448px, 96px, -21px) rotate3d(0.51, 0.12, 0.81, 174deg);
    -moz-transform: translate3d(448px, 96px, -21px) rotate3d(0.51, 0.12, 0.81, 174deg);
    -webkit-transform: translate3d(448px, 96px, -21px) rotate3d(0.51, 0.12, 0.81, 174deg);
    transform: translate3d(448px, 96px, -21px) rotate3d(0.51, 0.12, 0.81, 174deg);
    -ms-transform-origin: center center;
    -moz-transform-origin: center center;
    -webkit-transform-origin: center center;
    transform-origin: center center;
}

Tiziano Doria, OFC  (2015)

Tiziano Doria, OFC via

The glitch art is transposed to the analogical photography. The artist on his computer gets between the visualization and the contents, modifying the result of the visualization with “alchemical” algorithms. Doria does the same with the photography. The visualization of a picture on film is obtained by projecting on photographic paper. He acts on this procedure, bending the light through partially transparent materials and creating uncommon images.

 He acts on this procedure, bending the light through partially transparent materials and creating uncommon images.

Rosa Menkman, Cypher: Tacit Blue (2015)
The frustration of the act of deciphering a code is given to the visitor in an AV format. A code that involves series of small videos, images and sounds hiding a secret message that nobody knows (except for Rosa). Just visit her blog.

The pictures on the wall are physical keys to the online contents.

Chiara Passa, In Predicting in augmented space (2015)
Possa shapes the space through the medium of the smart phone or tablet. The pictures on the wall are physical keys to the online contents. The imaginaries of the galaxies, of the emoticons and the one of the google earth icons are fused in a cosmogony, or in a picture of the evolution of a portion of cosmos in something living and conscious. Here the demo via

Lorenzo Piovella, Oh Gold (2015)
Piovella gets his inspiration from this spot:

These buildings came from the abstraction of the materialization of luxury. The top of the skyscrapers represent the highest ambitions (power, money), the futuristic  architectural rendering of the tallest and cleanest buildings are the idealizations of the highest buildings in the world.
The virtualization of the concept (into the 3D model) is replacing the process of the idealization. The frustrated reaction of the user/viewer is mixed with a strange attraction.

The virtualization of the concept (into the 3D model) is replacing the process of the idealization.

Oh Gold! Lorenzo Piovella via

 

Rick Silva, The Silva field guide to birds of a parallel future (2015)
The series of short animations represents revolving eggs mixed with alien formations and geometric features.
The shape of the egg is explored and morphed to the limits, until the transformation into bird. The artist explores the recreation of the nature laws into a digital space ending up with a collection of animated jewels close in concept to Fabergè eggs.

The shape of the egg is explored and morphed to the limits, until the transformation into bird.

via

 

 

spazio-ultra
Next at Spazio Ultra

exhibition: HENRI ROUSSEAU Archaic candour – Palazzo Ducale – Venice (IT)

March 6 – July 5, 2015

A central figure in figurative art between the end of the 19th century and the revolutionary period of the avant-garde movements, and famous for his dreamlike atmospheres, forests and enchanted landscapes, Henri Rousseau (Laval, 1844 – Paris, 1910), has always been impossible to pigeonhole.

Henri Rousseau, 1897, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art

 

Henri Rousseau, 1891, Oil on canvas, National Gallery, London, England

These are two paintings you’re not going to see there.

 

The whole exhibition itinerary reports the debate held in Paris in the XIX century on the fact which Rousseau is whether or not an artist. Every description has an apologetic tone, trying to proof that those simple paintings are art. The proving process happens in mainly two ways:

  • Juxtaposing Rousseau’s painting to actual artists’ paintings from which he got some inspiration;
  • Listing opinions of other artists of the time.
Henri Rousseau Portrait de Madame M.1890, Paris, Musée d’Orsay

In the middle of this historical path the struggle of defining the outsider ends up to be something closer to entertainment than Art History, due also to the incoherent Pablo Picasso’s quotes and behavior.  The historical setting leads the viewer to confusion as no absolute truth is given at the end. That may be frustrating to someone, who will end up to enjoy – just visually – the paintings and the fascinating Palazzo Ducale.

 

exhibition: Ways to Modernism, MAK – Wien (AT)

The exhibition presents a contrasting selection of works from two pioneers of Modernism, complete with historical background and examples of their impact extending up to the present day. Josef Hoffmann (1870–1956) and Adolf Loos (1870–1933) were the most important architects and designers in Vienna around 1900 in the generation after Otto Wagner (1841–1918).

Adolf Loos, Bedroom in the Lina and Adolf Loos apartment, Vienna, 1st district, Bösendorferstraße 3, 1903 (reconstruction). Photo: © Peter Kainz/MAK. via

 

Adolf Loos pursued an evolutionary strategy that viewed utilitarian objects and architecture not as art products, but as the discrete background for individual lifestyles.

Josef Hoffmann, Bedroom in the Johanna and Dr. Johannes Salzer apartment, 1902 (reconstruction). Exhibition view at MAK, 2014. © MAK/Georg Mayer. via

 

Josef Hoffmann followed a revolutionary path that led to the creation of utilitarian objects and architecture as aesthetic products in an ever-changing array of new designs.

Exhibition view at MAK, 2014. Photo © Peter Kainz/MAK via

With the exhibition Ways to Modernism the Museum of the Academy of Applied Arts of Vienna should be considered the first museum to visit in Vienna, instead of Albertina, Mumok and Leopold.

The exhibition does not focus on the explanations, therefore attending the guided tour has to be considered by the novice to modern times architecture. Then even if the directors focus on the Loos/Hoffmann dichotomy, the most interesting pieces are the ones from Wien Museum collection by Otto Wagner:

Otto Wagner: perspective drawing of the apartment building at Neustiftgasse 40, Vienna, 1909. © Wien Museum. via

Bird’s eye views of Vienna’s master plan designed by Wagner are epic pieces of art nouveau their selves. Those watercolors would make perfect posters for the shop (unluckily they cannot be found on Internet). With this exhibition the Museum of the Academy of Applied Arts of Vienna should be considered the first museum to visit in Vienna, instead of Albertina, Mumok or Leopold.

exhibition: The Gijs+Emmy spectacle – The Stedelijk Museum – Amsterdam (NL)

 

The Stedelijk Museum presents The Gijs+Emmy Spectacle

From 22 Feb to 24 Aug 2014

 “The Stedelijk Museum presents The Gijs+Emmy Spectacle, Fashion and Jewelry design by Gijs Bakker and Emmy van Leersum. The exhibition is based on a legendary fashion show presented by the artist duo Gijs Bakker (1942) and Emmy van Leersum (1930–1984) in 1967.”

Sonja Bakker with Large Collar by Gijs Bakker, 1967, from collection Stedelijk Museum, ‘s-Hertogenbosch. Photograph by Matthijs Schrofer. via

The perfect shapes inspired by the geometry of industrial plants intercept the human body and confine it increasing its beauty.

The exhibition has the shape of a retrospective and the vibes of the celebration of the bright past of the jewelry design.  As the fifty years of the fashion cycle are passing by, Gijs+Emmy work deserve to influence today’s industry and fashion design. The perfect shapes inspired by the geometry of industrial plants intercept the human body and confine it increasing its beauty. The posture of the model is forced by the pieces of metal.
Sonja Bakker with Stovepipe Collar and Stovepipe Bracelet by Gijs Bakker, 1967. Collar from collection Centraal Museum, Utrecht. Armband from collection Stedelijk Museum, ’s-Hertogenbosch. Photograph by Matthijs Schrofer. via
The stunning pictures of Matthijs Schrofer provide the necessary documentation of the connection between the model – in this case Sonja Bakker – and the unnatural collars and bracelets.
Scholderpiece by Gijs Bakker, 1967. Photograph by Rien Bazen. via

As the posture of models is modified, the acting is surreal and majestic.

The space suits are just weird, sexy in an alien way. – Focus on the picture on the background – The genitals of the models ar deformed by the metal wire in the suit and gain a pure and beautiful form. The natural junctions are replaced by the archetype of a robotic junction.

photo: Gert Jan van Rooij via

Forcing the concepts in contemporary categories, Gijs+Emmy work should inspire the new ( and not strange to us) relation with technology. Everyday products have to fit to shape restrictions (due to functionality) and don’t bend to usability criterion and as a result they tend to change us. Need an example? The posture of the model of the next generation inflatable helmet designed by Hövding  resembles the one of a Kayan Lahwi woman.